iPOLL Databank: iPoll Databank

URL: https://libguides.cmich.edu/ipoll

Research Help

Search Steps

Step 1 - ACCESS TO iPOLL

Step 2 - SEARCH

  • Browse topics - an example of Browse topics. You can limit your search to organizations and dates.
  • Limit your search to Organization and Date From. The search results can be Sort By either Newest Survey First or Oldest Survey First.
  • Choosing keywords
  • Type keyword(s) into search fields - an example of keyword search , no "and" between search terms, but you can use "or."
  • Truncation sign can be either % or *, for example, "president%" can search for president, presidents, and presidential simultaneously.
  • Use ( . . .) to group words.

Step 3 - RETRIEVE TABLES

  • Open this sign     to retrieve a simple table - Simple tables show the results of survey and straightforward. 
  • Open this sign to retrieve crosstabulation tables. Crosstabulation tables can be more complicated and offer a look at how different groups whithin the sample answered the questoins.

Step 4 - SUMMARIZE/INTERPRET TABLES

  • A simple table
Harris Poll [November, 2002]
Would you generally trust each of the following types of people to tell the truth, or not? ...Pollsters

44% Would trust
43% Would not
13% Not sure/Refused

Methodology: Conducted by Harris Interactive, November 14-November 18, 2002 and based on telephone interviews with a national adult sample of 1,010. [USHARRIS.112702.R1O]

Data provided by The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, University of Connecticut.

You might say that the public is evenly split on judging the integrity of pollsters, according to this November 2002 telephone conducted by Harris Interactive and obtained from the Roper Center at the University of Connecticut.

  • A crosstabulation table
Cells contain:
-Column %
-N of cases

Are you white, black, Asian, or some other race?
Do you think race relations in YOUR COMMUNITY are generally good or generally bad?   White Black or
African-American
Asian Other Refused
Row
Total
Good 81.4
1409
72.4
171
91.5
21
79.0
124
63.6
12
80.2
1737
Bad 13.8
239
21.7
51
8.5
2
18.4
29
32.0
6
15.1
327
Don't Know/
No Answer
4.8
83
6.0
14
0
0
2.6
4
4.4
1
4.7
102
Col. Total 100.0
1730
100.0
237
100.0
23
100.0
157
100.0
18
100.0
2165

A New York Times poll in June 2000 found that among whites, 81% thought race relations in their community were "good", while 72% of black respondents found this to be the case. Conversely, 14% of whites and 22% of blacks identified their community race relations as "bad". Among those who identified with the "other" race category, 79% responded good and 18% bad to the question of race relations in their community. There were too few Asians in the sample to be able to statistically rely upon the percentages. These data were provided by the Roper Center at the University of Connecticut.

Source: New York Times Poll, Race Relations in America, June 2000
Data provided by the Roper Center at the University of Connecticut.

Analyzing Polls: Interpretive Analysis

More information on analyzing polls: Polling Fundamentals
 

Step 5 - CITE SURVEYS

 

iPOLL

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iPOLL basic search tutorial

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