18th Distance Library Services Conference: Paper Presentations

URL: https://libguides.cmich.edu/dls2018

Important Dates

Early Bird Registration
January 8 - February 18, 2018

Registration
February 19 - April 2, 2018

Conference
April 11-13, 2018

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Join the conference mailing list

Contact

Questions? Contact Thad Dickinson, Conference Coordinator

Email

Phone: (770) 933-7669

Paper Presentations

400 Years Old and Still Cutting Edge: Applying Ignatian Pedagogy to an Online Library Orientation
Anthony Tardiff, Gonzaga University

What can a four-hundred-year-old pedagogical paradigm teach us about 21st century online learning? You might be surprised! The Ignatian (or Jesuit) Pedagogical Paradigm is more relevant than ever in our tech-driven age, because it puts the student first. Come learn how the principles of Context, Experience, Reflection, Action, and Evaluation were applied to create a successful online library orientation that meets students where they are.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the five elements of the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm and articulate the relationship of each to student-centered learning.
  • Apply the principles of Ignatian pedagogy to implement student-centered learning in an online environment.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Instructional Design, Student Success


Ask Me Anything!: Reaching Out to Online Students in Higher Education Through Librarian-Led Virtual Office Hours 
Jennifer Rempel, Athabasca University

Need a new way to encourage off-campus students to take advantage of your library's reference services? Want to reach out to your patrons instead of waiting for them to come to you? Offering students a "virtual" office space in which to casually and anonymously ask for research help could be what you're looking for. This paper will describe the results of one distance education institution's six-month pilot program offering once-weekly, librarian-led virtual office hours. Learn about what worked, what didn't, and how we plan to move forward.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to determine whether an online office hours pilot program would be viable at their home institution.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of various means of marketing new library services to off-campus patrons.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Reference, Technology & Tools


Assessment, Analytics, and Analysis: Demonstrating the Impact of LMS Embedded Librarians on Student Learning
John Burke, Beth Tumbleson, Jessica Long
Miami University Regionals


The Ithaka S&R US Library Survey 2016 documents that library directors are committed to supporting teaching and learning services in terms of staffing and budget. They are equally committed to supporting student success, but find it difficult to articulate the library’s contribution. LMS embedded librarians are able to assess and validate the library’s contribution. Through a study conducted in 2017, embedded librarians explored the correlation between student success and information literacy instruction, using a rubric to assess student research papers and bibliographies and viewing course analytics. Assessment methodology, challenges, and discoveries from this and other research will be shared.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will consider the assessment methods currently in use in order to correlate librarians’ impact on student learning in the LMS.
  • Participants will be able to apply rubrics to assess student work in their own library settings.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Embedded Librarians, Value & Impact


Bridging the Gap: Information Literacy and Learning in Online Undergraduate Courses
Wei Zakharov, Purdue University

‚ÄčThis study investigates undergraduate students’ perception of the importance and their awareness of libraries’ services for online learning, challenges of using information to complete course assignments, and the ability to gather and evaluate information to complete online coursework. The findings contribute to four aspects of the Libraries’ programmatic efforts to support undergraduate students taking online courses. These include showing a need for IL, helping students stay connected to resources and support, pedagogic strategies, and strategically targeting courses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Investigate important libraries’ services for online learning and challenges in using information in undergraduate online courses.
  • Identify aspects of the libraries’ programmatic efforts to enhance undergraduate students’ information literacy and support learning in an online environment.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Information Literacy, Instructional Design


Bringing Scale and Structure to the Online Information Literacy Program
Nick Faulk, Champlain College

This case study will provide insights into how one library scaled and structured their information literacy program for their rapidly growing online learning division. Particular attention will be paid to strategies for reaching learners who bypass portions of the Liberal Studies requirements and techniques for designing assessable, sequenced modules taught by the instructor of record instead of an embedded librarian.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify the challenges to and solutions for scalable, structured online information literacy programs.
  • Participants will evaluate presented techniques for their applicability to the extant or desired online information literacy program at their own college.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Information Literacy, Instructional Design


"But This is How We've Always Done It": Overcoming Resistance to Change in the Quest to Support Distance Learners
Mia Breitkopf, The College at Brockport, State University of New York

"But this is how we've always done it." "We already tried that." "That won't work here." Sound familiar? Are you hearing "no" too often? The Association of College and Research Libraries' Standards for Distance Learning Library Services demand that we collaborate across our institutions to advocate for a culture of support for distance learners. But this can feel like an uphill battle. Learn about resistance to change, and how you can turn "no" to "yes" by using specific leadership and project management techniques.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define behaviors of organizations and people that exhibit resistance to change in order to recognize when resistance to change becomes a barrier to your work.
  • Describe several leadership and project management techniques that counter resistance to change in order to consider using them in your own work to enact change in your institution.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Advocacy, Leadership


Delivering a Collaborative Faculty Orientation to Off-Campus and International Campus Locations
Susan A. Mee, Cheryl A. Herdklotz, Anne Canale
Rochester Institute of Technology

Following in the same tradition of seamlessly providing access to library resources to our remote users, our campus has now taken the next logical step in also providing an orientation for new faculty teaching online as well as those teaching at our international campus locations. Without this type of orientation program, new faculty often feel isolated and left to navigate various systems, including library resources, the learning management system; student information systems; early alert tools; etc., completely on their own. Providing an orientation to this audience helps bring them together and allows them to acclimate to the various campus systems in an easier and much-less frustrating manner. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will have an understanding of the issues facing remote faculty and their challenges in becoming fluent users of the tools and resources available to them.
  • Attendees will have an understanding of the challenges in two departments collaborating to identify and deliver instruction to faculty.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Collaboration, Professional/Staff Development


Developing an Online Toolkit to Promote Business Information Literacy in Higher Education
Angie An, Stephanie Quail
York University


This case study highlights the user assessment techniques two academic business librarians employed to create a toolkit of online micro-learning supports to increase students’ business information literacy skills at their institution. Determined to make the toolkit engaging, relevant, and student-centered, the librarians conducted faculty and student needs assessments, focus groups, usability tests and established a student review group. Participants will learn about the user-centered approach the librarians engaged with when planning and developing the toolkit, while also gaining insight into how they used findings from their research to develop tailored micro-learning supports such as instructional videos and PDF resources. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to describe a variety of user assessment strategies that can be used when developing online learning objects.
  • Attendees will be able to summarize key findings from the librarians' research and apply some of the high-level findings to similar user groups at their own institutions (i.e. undergraduate and graduate business students).

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Information Literacy, Instructional Design


Framework + Digital Badges = Online Instruction for Today
Amanda Ziegler, University of West Florida

Designing information literacy modules hosted in the LMS from the ground up with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy allows librarians to teach and reach students both within coursework and independently. By using digital badges to track student progress through a holistic and complete curriculum that tackles the core ideas represented by the Framework and the tasks and topics that are important to students. Learn about the process of developing the modules, and how to modify this process for your own use, as well as discover the best tools for instructional design and digital badging.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to modify a process for developing online learning modules based upon the ACRL Framework.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify tools and best practices for creating modules tied to digital badges.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Information Literacy, Instruction


Going the Distance for Grads: What Online Graduate Students Want from the Library
Susie Skarl, Darcy Del Bosque
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

How do you know if your online graduate students know about the library, its services, and resources? Do they feel confident in their abilities to do research and do they know where to go for help? By surveying all types of graduate students, we were able uncover if distance users had unique needs and were able to use these results to collaborate with faculty and campus instructional designers to improve access to the library. Findings are linked to the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Standards for Distance Learning Library Services.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine graduate student library needs and learn how to investigate graduate student needs in your own setting.
  • Discover how to use survey results to improve collaboration with teaching faculty and other campus partners.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Access, Student Success


“I wanna be in the room where it happens”…Using Curriculum Mapping to Support the Information Literacy Goals of Online Programs
Amanda Ziegler, University of West Florida

How can we ensure that we as librarians are present in the courses where our students need us most? Curriculum mapping can seem overwhelming and unwieldy, but it can be adapted to a more utilitarian format to help connect with and establish relationships with students and faculty in online programs in the hopes of expanding formalized online instruction. In order to provide service excellence to their institutions, librarians can use curriculum mapping to target their outreach and instruction for maximum impact.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to develop goals and a process for creating curriculum maps.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify how curriculum maps can be used to maximize outreach, instruction, assessment, and coordination with library colleagues.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Assessment, Technology & Tools


Implementing a Proactive Chat Widget in an Academic Library
Lydia L. Pyburn, University of Texas at Arlington

Proactive chat widgets can help to increase chat usage for libraries. Implementing it for the library can help to reach users at the point when they need help. Learn how one academic library implemented a proactive chat widget on their website, library catalog, and their databases. This paper will cover the successes and challenges of reviewing several proactive chat software considered for implementation, the collaboration of departments within to test and launch the widget, analyzing chat transcripts for coverage and training, and roles of the different departments staffing the chat service.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to look at chat statistics and transcripts to identify coverage and training needs.
  • Learn how to pilot and implement a proactive chat widget.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Assessment, Technology & Tools


In Seven Countries and Six Time Zones: Working Together Across the Globe to Serve Our Students
Holly Hubenschmidt, Emily Scharf
Webster University

At our university, solo librarians staff libraries on six campuses in Africa, Europe, and Asia. On main campus, ten librarians work at a traditional library while striving to serve our faculty and students worldwide at US metro, military, and international campuses, as well as online. To ensure consistency for our users, we have constructed a network to communicate and collaborate. We meet as a large group monthly, collaborate on projects, and more. This presentation will discuss how we built this network, challenges to communication, and the benefits of tapping into the diversity and expertise of librarians around the world.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify methods of collaboration and communication with colleagues from a distance.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to explore possibilities for better communication across their own campus networks.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Collaboration, Professional & Staff Development


Is the Medium the Message?: Examining Transactions Conducted via Text in Comparison with Traditional Virtual Reference Methods
Tara Mawhinney, Svetlana Kochkina
McGill University

Is the medium the message? Does the type of question users have influence the method of communication they choose? After this session, you will find out what a large academic library discovered about their users from evaluating their pilot texting service. This session will help you to learn how to choose from the variety of mediums (chat, email, and text) available for virtual reference service. If you are considering expanding or reducing your current virtual reference service, join this session to learn about the differences between the questions asked through these different mediums.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will learn about the difference in the questions received by a virtual reference service through different mediums of communication. This will allow them to determine if these means of communication should be offered to users at their library.
  • Attendees will learn the methods used in the current study that are transferable and can be applied to analyze their own virtual reference service. Analyzing patterns in question type can facilitate a better understanding of whether or not the currently offered means of communication are best suited for the type of questions libraries are receiving and can help to determine the adequacy of the service provision model.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Reference, Technology & Tools


It's a Win-Win-Win: Using Human Peer to Peer Networks to Reach Learners Where They Are
Stacey Brownlie, University of Maine System

Are you interested in participatory learning and peer learning theory? Could your institution or department benefit from value-added ways to market library resources and librarian expertise to your distance learners? This session will present a case study of a pilot program to collaborate with a writing center coordinator and instructional design team, with the goal of cross-training virtual writing tutors in baseline research skills and together obtaining CRLA certification.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to explain peer learning theory in order to apply it to distance library services in relevant ways.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to analyze a Creative Commons peer tutor library skills training module in order to find elements that may apply to their own needs.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Collaboration, Instructional Design


Library Connection: Making Online Students Feel At-Home in the Library
Victoria Raish, Anne Behler
Penn State University

Want to include an active learning experience in an orientation format? Need to figure out how to balance scaling instruction and personalized feedback? This session will focus on a program known as library connection. This is a virtual orientation for online students offered as a series of digital badges. The process of creating and identifying learning outcomes, partnering with faculty to support the orientation, assessing student work, and iterating on the current design will be covered in this session. Participants will see interesting data and come away prepared with a plan to institute a similar initiative at their university.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess the success of the library connection in terms of student work in the badges and instructor feedback on student work in order to identify what aspects of the orientation lead to successful outcomes.
  • Describe the library connection in detail in order to understand how a similar orientation can occur at the attendee's home institution.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: First-Year Experience, Instructional Design


Library Instruction in the Learning Management System: Supporting Student Success in the First-Year Experience
Francesca Marineo, Nevada State College
Qingmin Shi, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Thinking of moving away from the one-shot and into the learning management system (LMS)? Afraid to transition your instruction from in-person to online? Look no further! This presentation will discuss the collaboration of an instructional design librarian and quantitative analyst to integrate and assess an information literacy module in the LMS for a first-year experience course. From designing the module and getting faculty buy-in to demonstrating the module’s positive (and significant!) impact on student success, this session will provide you with the tools you need to successfully integrate your library instruction into the LMS!

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify the benefits of integrating library resources and services within the LMS in order to better serve distance and online students.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to critique various student success metrics in order to improve and expand assessment of library instruction and its impact on student learning.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Learning Management Systems, Students Success


Love at First Cite: Using APA Style CENTRAL to Reach Distance Students (CANCELED)
Dawn Harper, American Psychological Association

Learn from an APA Style CENTRAL trainer how you can use tools, services, and content in APA’s newest APA Style product, APA Style CENTRAL, to teach APA Style and information literacy. This session will provide an overview of the platform and institutional use cases.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and locate APA Style CENTRAL content that can be used in bibliographic and course instruction.
  • Identify two different ways APA Style CENTRAL content can be incorporated into online resources.

Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Technology & Tools, Scholarly Communication


Mind the Gap! Making the Leap to Reach Distance Students Through On-Campus Events
Melody Diehl Detar, Regent University

Rethink your “library as place” to digitize events that reach your students across the world! This session will review the journey of reshaping an event, once held only on campus, to include distance students. It will explore the impact of outreach events and describe logistics involved in re-imagining an event, marketing methods and creative workarounds for challenges unique to an online environment. The speaker will apply personal experience to spark ideas about how librarians can re-envision different events to provide excellent services to their online students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand the benefits of outreach through events for distance students.
  • Attendees will be encouraged to creatively extend on-campus events to the distance population.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Accessibility, Information Literacy


Mortal or Moodle? A Comparison of In-Person vs. Online Information Literacy Instruction
Emily Gorman, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Catherine Staley, Loyola Notre Dame Library

Find out how on-campus students feel about online learning! Join us as we explore the effectiveness of in-person vs. online instruction methods to teach library research skills to upper-level undergraduates, as measured by performance on a literature review assignment. We will also discuss the students’ preferences for online or in-person instruction for library-taught material as reported through an anonymous survey.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to state several ways of measuring instructional success in order to evaluate instructional methods.
  • At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify potential opportunities for collaboration with faculty at their institution in order to assess various instructional methods for library-related material.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Instruction, Student Success


On the Edge: How to Provide Course and Program-Integrated Library Support Without Being Embedded
Liz Johns, Sara Oestreich
Johns Hopkins University

We are asked to provide a large amount of library support to one of our fully online programs. They love us! The problem is -- they don’t want to embed us. Over time, we have created what we call a ‘halo’ of library services that support students at point of need, but do not require us to be embedded into their course management software. Students are at the center of the plan, with a focus on collaborative teaching and reflection. This paper will help librarians think about how they can provide curricula-connected, innovative services even when they are not fully embedded.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate how traditional library services can be used in new and innovative ways.
  • Explore strategies to provide integrated services when standard embedding is not an option.

Audience: Experienced in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Embedded Librarians, Innovation


Showing Students We Care: Using Empathetic Marketing to Ease Library Anxiety and Reach Distance Students
Carrie Girton, Miami University Hamilton

“3 research papers due next week. Minimum of 25 total sources needed. Feeling overwhelmed? The librarian can help!” Empathetic marketing shows distance students ways that library services and staff can meet their core emotional needs. Meeting these needs assists in building connections between students and the library staff, helps ease library anxiety, and provides information about library services in new ways. Join us as we discuss ways that libraries can incorporate empathetic marketing to reach distance students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will learn what empathetic marketing is and how libraries can use empathetic marketing.
  • Attendees will discover ways that they can incorporate empathetic marketing in their outreach endeavors to distance students.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Student Success


Student-Staffed Virtual Reference Services: How to Meet the Training Challenge
Kathryn Barrett, Amy Greenberg
Scholars Portal, Ontario Council of University Libraries

Become a confident virtual reference trainer! In a changing environment where student workers are increasingly taking on chat reference responsibilities, training is more essential than ever to ensure that service quality standards are met. Join experienced trainers as they discuss students workers’ unique training needs and share virtual reference training best practices. Learn from a longstanding training program that prepares large cohorts of library school students to provide reference and research services each year. You’ll take away techniques to improve your own training program!

Learning Objectives:

  • Define the training needs of student workers who provide chat reference service.
  • Adopt effective training strategies, techniques, and best practices for virtual reference in your own library setting.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Professional & Staff Development, Reference


Supporting Student-Led Content Creation in the Distance Learning Environment with LibGuides CMS
Jeffrey M. Mortimore, Ruth L. Baker
Georgia Southern University

LibGuides CMS provides a flexible platform for supporting student-created work in the distance learning environment, including profiles, blogs, and html/scripting projects. This session explores how presenters opened up the LibGuides CMS platform to host collaboratively developed course content and student projects grounded in metaliteracy concepts embedded in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. Faculty and students are invited onto the platform as content creators and editors, while librarians provide instruction and technical support. Presenters will discuss practical, pedagogical, and technical considerations for supporting student-created content on LibGuides CMS, including access control and student privacy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will learn techniques for adapting and managing the LibGuides CMS platform to provide a platform for collaborative curriculum development and student-led content creation in the distance learning environment.
  • Attendees will learn about pedagogical approaches to developing student-created, blended learning experiences for distance learners with a wide range of prior technology and content creation experience.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Instruction, Learning Management Systems


To Infinity and Beyond: Reducing Textbook Costs Through Librarian/Faculty Collaborations
Sandy Avila, Christina C. Wray
University of Central Florida

Librarians and Faculty have a shared goal to reduce textbook costs by finding alternative ways to provide the same quality content, but at a price students can handle. One way to accomplish this is by utilizing electronic and open resources. This session will provide guidelines for librarians supporting faculty during this transition. Participants will learn how to collaborate with faculty to identify resource needs, evaluate when to utilize open textbook options, techniques to help reticent faculty make a smooth transition, and tips on how to support student access throughout the course.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify key planning elements to help Faculty transition to using online and open resources.
  • Participants will be able to analyze course materials and environments to help support faculty identify when developing an open textbook is the better option.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Collaboration, Open Educational Resources


Two Decades of Learning in 45 Minutes!; A Systematic Review and Discussion of the Research on Marketing Library Services to Distance Students
Maria Brahme, Pepperdine University

This paper presents a systematic literature review of research conducted on marketing library resources to distance students.  Presenters' findings will synthesize research conducted in the last two decades on this critical topic. Numerous studies have been published in this area, creating a need to critically review and benchmark findings. Librarians need to have a comprehensive picture of what has been learned in order to choose tools that allow effective communication with their distance constituents. Moreover, in order to develop robust innovative approaches, a clear understanding of advantages and drawbacks of prior discoveries is essential.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will gain a comprehensive picture of research conducted on marketing library services for distance students.
  • Attendees will learn what marketing methods have been successful and with what populations. Additionally, colleagues interested in furthering this research will have a thorough understanding of the studies already conducted.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Trends & Forecasting, Value & Impact


Two Thousand Students, One Librarian: Balancing Depth and Breadth of Library Instruction for Distance and Online Students
Lindley Homol, Northeastern University

Have you created asynchronous tutorials for distance learners, but want to create deeper learning opportunities? Have you embedded librarians in several distance courses, but wonder how to scale classroom instruction? Learn how a librarian for a graduate-level Education program of distance and online learners balanced the competing demands of depth and breadth of research instruction and the tools and technology used to do so.

Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to evaluate their current instructional offerings to online or distance learners to identify opportunities for broadening or deepening instructional outreach.
  • By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to identify campus partners and technology tools to assist in implementing, promoting, and assessing online instructional outreach.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Instruction, Technology & Tools


Using a Library Learning Object Repository to Empower Teaching Excellence for Distance Students
Lisa Becksford
Virginia Tech

Are you interested in creating new programs or services for distance learners, but are unsure of where to start? Come hear how librarians at one research university created a learning object repository in response to student and faculty needs. You’ll learn about challenges and opportunities encountered during the repository’s development as well as strategies for growing and marketing similar initiatives for distance students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the needed components for developing and maintaining a learning object repository or other tool to support distance learners at their institution.
  • Apply best practices for growing, marketing, and sustaining initiatives to support distance learners in order to apply them within distance programs at their own libraries.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Campus-Wide Initiatives, Open Educational Resources


UX and Your Library: A Scalable Model
Natalie Haber, Steven Shelton, William Chassaing
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Attend this how-to session to learn about the importance and usefulness of creating a model for ongoing user experience assessment at your library. If you’re looking for a rundown on a variety of tools that help gauge the usability of your website, this is the session for you. The presenters plan to demonstrate a number of free and low cost analytics software options to help you understand how patrons are using your website. Want to conduct your own user experience tests? This session will finish with an overview of common user experience testing techniques, approaches and best practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to discuss the importance and usefulness of ongoing user experience initiatives with library colleagues and administrators in order to gain library support.
  • Participants will become familiar with a variety of tools and techniques that may be used to gauge user experience with the library’s website so that they will be able to create their own model for user experience.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: User Experience
Tags: Assessment, Technology & Tools


Virtual and Valued: A Review of the Successes (and a Few Failures) of the Creation, Implementation, and Evaluation of an Inaugural Virtual Conference and Monthly Webinars
Mollie Peuler, Central Piedmont Community College
Kelly McCallister, Appalachian State University

Are you interested in hosting online professional development opportunities—but intimidated? Fear not! Learn how a group of academic librarians from different institutions collaborated virtually to plan, market, host, and evaluate a series of online webinars and a virtual conference. Lessons learned from this project will be shared, including successes to build upon as well as mistakes made along the way, along with the beginning ideas for future events. An emphasis will be placed on best practice in collaborative technologies and how to successfully market a conference to solicit national attendance.

Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of this session attendees will be able to host a virtual conference or webinar series using a variety of web conferencing technologies and software.
  • By the end of this session attendees will be able to implement a marketing plan in order to advertise a new national online webinar series.

Audience: New to the topic
Track: Outreach & Marketing
Tags: Collaboration, Professional & Staff Development


When Online Instruction Doesn’t Measure Up: How Can You Tell, and What Should You Do?
Marcia Rapchak, Duquesne University

How do you know your online instruction matches the service level of your face-to-face instruction? What if your online instruction misses the mark? At [institution], instruction assessment for a one-credit, required course occurs at a variety of levels, both programmatic and individual. Our assessment results revealed some major gaps in the experience for students who took the course online versus those who took it face-to-face. This presentation will provide ways to measure your online instruction, and ways to make it as effective as (if not more effective than!) your face-to-face instruction.

Learning Objectives:

  • Design course assignments and activities that overcome the typical challenges of online learning.
  • Provide appropriate levels of instructor interaction to increase student engagement.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Information Literacy, Instruction


Where in the World is My Librarian? Creating Cross-Campus Collaborations to Seamlessly Connect with Students When Librarians, Students, and Faculty are in Different Locations
Liz Johns, Carrie Price, Toni Ungaretti 
Johns Hopkins University

Support for distance ed programs is often provided at a central location, with librarians and faculty at a home campus, with students in disparate areas. However, the model at one university required librarians, faculty, and students to all be in different locations, making library collaboration and support somewhat more challenging. This paper will present the strategies used to create a web of support that crosses campuses, and disciplines and meets the unique needs of full-time medical professionals engaged in a part-time online master of education program.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore ways a comprehensive program map can provide insight into library support and stimulate new ideas for service excellence.
  • Outline strategies for interlibrary-collaboration to provide new, innovative, and sustainable support to distance education programs.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Collaboration, Embedded Librarians


Working Out the Bugs: Piloting Library Instruction in an Online Entomology Graduate Program
Andrew J. Cano, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Are you tired of library instruction being front loaded in the first few weeks of students’ academic experience? Have you wondered how you can foster active learning throughout an academic program? Do you just want to promote information literacy while studying insects? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then come learn about how a state university’s Virtual Learning Librarian helped design an online information literacy curriculum for a graduate Entomology program, the impact of this curriculum to-date, and how this curriculum is promoting active learning in the virtual classroom.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of the session, attendees will be able to state critical steps and stages of developing a fully online information literacy curriculum in order to develop similar programs in their assigned academic areas.
  • At the end of the session, attendees will be able to define active learning in order to apply it to the development of online library instruction.

Audience: Some experience in the topic
Track: Teaching & Learning
Tags: Instruction, Instructional Design